Recruitment paused PhD in Organizational Behaviour/Human Resource Management

Reference:
ERIM PhD RSM 2018 ORG OB_HRM

Abstract

People are the greatest asset of organizations delivering complex products or services. For such knowledge-intensive work, it is of crucial importance that individuals proactively contribute their knowledge, expertise, and creativity in collaborative team efforts to realize high-quality performance. With growing diversity and reliance on cross-national collaborations, this also increasingly includes the ability to bridge gaps in understanding and experience to achieve effective collaboration and synergy. All of this renders an understanding of the factors influencing the motivation, collaboration, and performance of people at work of growing importance to business success. The influence of such factors is the domain of study of organizational behaviour (OB) and human resource management (HRM)– the study of individuals, groups and organizational practices at work. In studying these influences, ERIM’s research group OB/HRM highlights the role of leadership, team work, HR practices and employee well-being in the performance of individuals and teams. The research group is looking for a PhD candidate in OB/HRM to be part of this program of research. The specific focus of the project will be determined in a collaboration between the PhD candidate and the supervising faculty, but the expectation is that the focus would be aligned with the core expertise of the supervisory team in leadership, diversity, HR management, performance management, teamwork, creativity, and empowerment.

Keywords

Leadership, HR management and performance and wellbeing outcomes, diversity, stewardship, creativity, innovation, team work, social relations, empowerment, motivation, identification at work

Topic

Companies can increasingly achieve a competitive advantage through their human capital – the people working and the company and the knowledge, information, and expertise they represent. High-quality performance in knowledge-intensive work relies greatly on people’s ability to contribute their expertise, insights, and ideas to collaborative team efforts. This holds the challenge of effectively motivating diverse groups of people to collaborate for collective objectives and to integrate their diverse expertise and insights to reach more innovative, higher-quality products and services. With growing diversity and reliance on cross-national collaborations, this also increasingly includes the ability to bridge gaps in understanding and experience to achieve effective collaboration and synergy. Most notably is the renewed interest in leadership for the flourishing for modern-day organizations and the people within it. All of this renders an understanding of the factors influencing the motivation, collaboration, and performance of people at work of growing importance to business success and building sustainable business. The influence of such factors is the domain of study of organizational behaviour – the study of individuals and groups at work. The research group (i.e., Dirk van Dierendonck, Steffen Giessner, Gabriele Jacobs, Rebecca Hewett, Inga Hoever, Hannes Leroy, Meir Shemla, Sofy Isakyaan, Tina Davidson, Saskia Bayerl and others) is looking for a PhD candidate in OB/HRM to be part of this program of research. The specific focus of the project will be determined in collaboration with the supervising faculty, but the expectation is that the focus would be aligned with their core expertise. The following outlines issues that could provide fruitful starting points for the project.

For research on teams, the key question is how teams can effectively coordinate their expertise, efforts, and behaviour while representing satisfying and stimulating work environments for their members. Modern workplaces regularly rely on teams to accomplish some of their core tasks and objectives thus rendering knowledge on successful teamwork a priority. In this respect, the research group has a strong tradition of research team composition, team leadership, team learning, team creativity, and team processes and on how these play out across time and levels of analysis.

For leadership research, the key question is what makes leaders effective in mobilizing and motivating followers. For today’s organizations that focus on knowledge-intensive work, leadership has become a critical issue. For instance, one leadership challenge these organizations face is the need to foster leadership that develops employees’ proactive engagement and enhances creativity and innovation. At the same time, they face challenges in building commitment and motivation around a shared vision in times when organizations become more diverse and employees’ have a great degree of autonomy. Additional challenge for leadership is how to put issues of ethics, morality, and social responsibility high on the agenda for employees who have great freedom in shaping their own actions at work. The research group investigates such issues as part of the extensive research they conduct on servant leadership, empowering leadership, sustainability leadership and visionary leadership.

For HRM research, a stronger and more explicit inclusion of insights drawn from organizational behaviour perspective can lead to intriguing new research. Especially within a context of ongoing job layoffs and increased work pressure, attention for topics such as performance and reward management, leadership development, and diversity management can be more relevant than ever. In this respect, the research group pays specific attention to the challenges of cross-cultural collaboration, organizational climates for diversity and inclusion, and to the role of stereotypes in cross-cultural interactions. Likewise, the group is concerned with the processes through which people management practices influence individual wellbeing and performance outcomes, including attributional processes, employee motivation, and the role of managers in HR implementation. 

Supervisory Team